PUBG’s Creator Now Says All Xbox One Versions Run At 30 FPS

PUBG’s Creator Now Says All Xbox One Versions Run At 30 FPS

In a recent interview with GamesTM, Brendan Greene – aka the titular PlayerUnknown of PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds – said the Xbox One X version of his battle-royale shooter was “definitely” running at 60 FPS on the Xbox One X console. This morning, he backed away from those words saying that “PUBG will run at 30 FPS across all Xbox One devices.”

As you can see in the tweet embedded below, he cites the game’s early development status as part of the reason why a higher frame rate isn’t possible at this time. The game enters Microsoft’s Game Preview program on December 12.

Like he said, it’s possible the game could receive frame rate-enhancing tweaks during the Game Preview period, but expect 30 FPS for the foreseeable future – like how it ran during our last hands-on time with the game.

Our Take
The Xbox One X is already a tricky sell, and not having a flagship game like PUBG take full advantage of the pricey hardware in terms of framerate is a letdown. 

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Tune In To Our First Live Super Replay Right Now!

Tune In To Our First Live Super Replay Right Now!

Our community recently raised over $60,000 for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals through our 25-hour Extra Life livestream. As a big “thank you” for donating so much, we decided to give the community something they’ve wanted for years: a Super Replay of Ape Escape!

Given our busy schedules with the holidays coming up, we don’t have a window to record a traditional, episode-based Super Replay before the end of the year. We didn’t want to wait until 2018, so we’re going to try recording an entire playthrough of Ape Escape in one livestream. Our attempt to round up every ape will begin on December 1 at 8 a.m. CT. We won’t end until we see the credits roll.

The stream will be hosted on Twitch, YouTube, and right here on Game Informer’s site. Join us for what will surely be a day of fun and wacky things. We are going to try to record this as closely as we can to the traditional format, and will break it apart into episodes that you can watch well after the livestream ends.

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Hawaii State Legislator: Regulation “Could Be A Slippery Slope”

Hawaii State Legislator: Regulation “Could Be A Slippery Slope”

In an interview with Glixel, one of the legislators responsible for last week’s press conference confirming the state of Hawaii is investigating the legality of lootboxes was asked about regulation.

“The fear when you introduce government legislation into private enterprise is that we are going to overreach,” State Representative Sean Quinlan told Glixel. “That is my fear. Ultimately, it’s best for the industry to self-police.” But Quinlan does not expect this to be especially likely.

“I know they have a fiduciary responsibility to shareholders, but I think they have a responsibility to customers too,” Quinlan says. “So the ESRB could say that if a game has loot crates, it gets a 21-plus rating. I wouldn’t want it to be a federal law. I think that could be a very slippery slope.”

Quinlan, who describes himself as a gamer, found out about the problem by checking the front page of Reddit.

“It’s the front page of the Internet right?” Quinlan explained. “I was on Reddit one morning, and every single post on the front page was about Battlefront. I realized just how bad it has gotten. We’ve been on this path for 15 years with day-one DLC, subscription passes, pay-to-win. We as consumers kept accepting that, kept buying those games. Now we’re at a place where we need to consider, do we need to legislate? Does the ESRB have to consider a new rating that could deal with gambling and addictive mechanics?”

Quinlan has an uphill climb, as the definition of gambling may not include lootboxes, and it is ultimately up to personal interpretation. This makes legislation, or at least sounding the alarm bells, particularly difficult, but Quinlan is hoping for something to be done.

“I think the mechanism is so close to gambling, when we talk about psychology and the way addiction and reward works, I think whether or not it means the strict definition of gambling, it’s close enough and the impact is close enough,” he told Glixel.

[Source: Glixel]

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Shadow Of The Colossus Developer Commentary Shows Off Its Beautifully Remade Intro

Shadow Of The Colossus Developer Commentary Shows Off Its Beautifully Remade Intro

Shadow of the Colossus, the PlayStation 4 remake of the 2005 Fumitu Ueda classic, is coming in just a few months, but you can whet your appetite by watching developer Bluepoint walk you through the intro to the game.

The remake was announced this past E3 as a top-down graphical overhaul, but with few changes to the actual content of the game, so no missing Colossi or new areas. The most significant change is a new control scheme to attempt to bring Shadow of the Colossus’ controls to a new audience.

Additionally, Bluepoint is targeting 60 FPS when the game is played on a PlayStation 4 Pro.

You can check out the trailer below. You can also find our preview of the game from Paris Games Week right here. Shadow of the Colossus releases on the PlayStation 4 on February 6.

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Epic Outlines The Future Of Fortnite

Epic Outlines The Future Of Fortnite

Whether or not Fortnite’s success caught Epic off guard is anyone’s guess, but the developer is being surprisingly reactive and outlining where they plan to take the game in the coming months.

In a blog post today, Epic talked about how they plan to improve things like teaming up with friends, team killing, and improvements to the game’s visual fidelity.

Epic wants to revamp the way players can play together, trying to fix the current system of Duos and Squads. Certain regions, like Oceania, don’t even have Duos playlists, so the developer plans to take action to fix that.

As for team killing, Epic was forced to apologize for not having a proper system in place to combat the problem.

“We dropped the ball on addressing team killing,” the developer wrote. “We take action based on player reports, but the system isn’t straightforward to use, and doesn’t let you know whether we took action or not. This needs improvement. Last week we started casting a wider net to catch current and past team killers and issued numerous warnings and bans. We are also working on better analytical models to weed out the worst offenders and long term would love to have the ability to pair you with players with good reputation.”

You can check out the blog post at the source link at the below, but one notable aspect is that Epic is looking to maintain 30 frames per second on the console as its main target and does not look to be increasing or lowering it at all.

[Source: Fortnite Blog]

Our Take
Epic has been very reactive to the Fortnite community, which is the key to a longterm successful multiplayer game. With their insistence on going after cheaters, though not in all the smartest ways, Epic does seem like they want to foster a healthy community.

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He-Man Movie Reboot Has Found Its Director – Report

He-Man Movie Reboot Has Found Its Director – Report

The big screen reboot of the classic cartoon and toy line Masters of the Universe has been in development for many years, but it now seems to be closer to actually happening. Following the announcement of a release date earlier this year, it has been reported that a director may have been found.

According to The Wrap, David S. Goyer is in talks to helm the movie. Goyer is mostly known as a writer, having worked on the scripts for a variety of films for DC, including Man of Steel, The Dark Knight, and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. As a director, he previously helmed Blade: Trinity and the horror movie The Unborn.

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Goyer was already involved with writing the Masters of the Universe reboot, so it is not surprising that he might also take on directing duties. The last director to be associated with the movie was Terminator: Salvation director McG, but he has since left the project. In August 2015, it was reported that Thor writer Christopher Yost was working on the script, but it is unknown what stage this reached. The film is currently scheduled for a 2019 release.

Mattel launched the Masters of the Universe toy line in 1982, creating a mythology about the conflict between good and evil on the planet of Eternia. A cartoon based on the property, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe ran for two years, in addition to a comic book series, a spinoff animation called She-Ra: Princess of Power, and a number of video games.

In 1987, Cannon Films produced a live-action movie version, starring Dolph Lundgren as muscle-bound hero He-Man. By that point, however, the popularity of Masters of the Universe was in decline, and the toys were discontinued the following year. Subsequent attempts to revive the franchise included a new toy line and a short-lived second animated series in the early 2000s.

Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

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Need for Speed Payback – Customisations Guide

Need for Speed Payback – Customisations Guide

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PUBG Will Run At 30 FPS On All Xbox One Devices, PlayerUnknown Clarifies

PUBG Will Run At 30 FPS On All Xbox One Devices, PlayerUnknown Clarifies

[Update] Brendan “PlayerUnknown” Greene has clarified that PUBG will run at 30 FPS on all the Xbox devices, including the Xbox One X, when the game becomes available through Xbox’s Game Preview Program.

[Original story] PUBG is finally coming to Xbox One in December. On Xbox One X, you can expect the Hunger Games-style shooter to run at 60 FPS, creator Brendan Greene said in a new interview. But on the standard Xbox One, which has less power, the frame rate could be halved.

“Definitely on Xbox One X, 60 FPS,” Greene said in the latest issue of GamesTM, as reported by Wccftech. “On [the standard] Xbox One, we’re not sure. We may have to limit it at 30 FPS, maybe, but the last time I saw it, it was running at about 30 to 40.”

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Greene, who is the Playerunknown from the game’s title, added that developer Bluehole is “constantly improving” the game before launch, with an aim of hitting 60 FPS on both the standard Xbox One and the Xbox One X. One of the reasons why PUBG is launching on Xbox One through Game Preview program is to allow the developer the opportunity to improve the game in a test environment before its official launch. Overall, Greene said he has “great faith” that PUBG will hit 60 FPS on both.

At the same time, Greene acknowledged that frame rate “isn’t that important” for a game like PUBG compared to a twitch-based shooter like Call of Duty.

Also in the interview, Greene spoke generally about bringing PUBG to console. He said he’s happy to have partnered with Microsoft for the initial launch because “Xbox is synonymous with gaming.” Greene said there is the opportunity to see “incredible numbers” on console. Indeed, the huge success of the PUBG-like Fortnite Battle Royale seems to suggest console gamers are thirsty for the Battle Royale experience.

Greene told GameSpot earlier this year that he wants the Xbox One X version of PUBG to use 4K assets, but he wasn’t sure if this would be possible. That still seems to be the case, as Greene told the magazine that these 4K assets “don’t exist yet,” adding that “it’s going to take us some time to get them, but we do have a plan.”

Whatever the case, no matter which platform you’re playing on, Greene said he wants to ensure that the experience is similar on all systems. “There shouldn’t be an advantage to buying one console over another,” Greene explained.

While PUBG’s only current announced console platform is Xbox One, Microsoft has said the game is a “console launch exclusive” for Xbox. That seems to suggest a PlayStation 4 release may follow. PUBG launches on Xbox One on December 12.

Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

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Batman Ninja Anime Gets Incredible First Trailer, Watch It Here

Batman Ninja Anime Gets Incredible First Trailer, Watch It Here

Batman is one of the most beloved superheroes of all time, but with so many different actors, movies, and TV shows about him across the decades, it’s hard to think of what else can be done with the character. But it seems that there are still new and exciting ways to present the Caped Crusader–and the upcoming anime feature Batman Ninja is the proof.

Fans attending New York Comic-Con in September got a first taste of what to expect from the animated feature when a clip was screened there, and now the full trailer is online. As the title suggests, it’s a glorious mash-up of wild samurai action and classic Batman characters. So if you’ve ever wanted to see Batman, Joker, Harley Quinn, The Penguin, and Catwoman in an insane anime movie, here’s your chance. Check the trailer out below:

Batman Ninja has an impressive team of anime veterans behind the scenes. Creators Junpei Mizusaki, Takashi Okazashi, and Kazuki Nakashima have worked on shows such as Afro Samurai, Kill La Kill, and Gurren Lagann.

At the Comic-Con launch, the trio revealed that that they were approached by Warner to create the feature, and as huge Batman fans they jumped at the chance. “There’s a fight scene in this that might be the best fight scene I’ve seen in animation anywhere,” Miereanu told Comicbook.com. In addition, Mizusaki explained that all the action was acted out by performers in live-action, with the choreography motion-captured to assist the animation.

Batman Ninja is yet to be given a release date, but it is expected to arrive in 2019.

Got a news tip or want to contact us directly? Email news@gamespot.com

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DropMix Review – IGN

DropMix Review – IGN

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One of the most exciting music games of recent years, but not without its problems.

Putting cards down onto a DropMix board is as close to magic as I’ve felt with a game for quite some time. Part-game, part-DJ deck, this Harmonix-Hasbro mixed media experiment is completely unique, and an absolute joy for anyone even vaguely interested in music – which makes it incredibly sad to say that questionable business decisions in how to release the game come close to crippling its appeal.

The basic concept is simple. Every DropMix card is the “stem” of a song – say, the vocals from ‘Ms. Jackson’, the drums from ‘It’s Tricky’, or the strings from ‘Call Me Maybe’. Put them into one of the game board’s five slots, and a Bluetooth-connected device with the free DropMix app will start playing that stem. Add another card, and the two stems play together, automatically matching their key and tempo.

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It’s a very neat system – the NFC chipped cards respond to being placed on the board near-instantly and, brilliantly, the game always knows which card is on top of a stack, meaning you don’t need to remove stems to place new ones. Add up to five stems and you’ll have created a full song, perfectly in sync and, often, good enough to save to the game’s memory to be played back later.

Stems can be vocals, lead melody, rhythm sections, percussion or, best of all, cards that can be any of the four, and reconfigure the entire mix around them after a breakdown – there’s nothing like hearing the “ooh-AH-AH-AH-AH” of Disturbed’s Down With the Sickness absolutely destroy and then assimilate Gloria Gaynor.

It is, frankly, incredible how well all of this works. Harmonix has brought its years of experience with repurposing licensed tracks, and created its most ludicrous, amazing feat of musical engineering yet. With absolutely no skill required, anyone holding a stack of DropMix cards can create genuinely excellent (or at the very least interesting) music.

I’ve turned Evanescence into an electro-pop act, morphed Duck Sauce’s ‘Barbara Streisand’ into an apocalyptic march, and made Ed Sheeran sound close to likeable. It’s a discovery tool of sorts, too – for instance I’ve found out that every song in the world is made better by Sean Paul’s vocals from ‘Temperature’. That’s just a fact in my head now.

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It’s not just a fancy toy, however. Alongside a Freestyle option, DropMix comes with two game modes, Clash and Party. Party’s the simpler of the two, allowing up to five players to play the most distractingly cool game of Go Fish ever conceived. The game calls out elements of cards – card colour, type of instrument, or invented ‘power ratings’ – and the group has to check their hand to meet that request as quickly as possible. You’re playing co-operatively for a high score (all tracked by the app, thankfully), while making a single, evolving track in the background.

DropMix is at its best with Clash, though. A 1v1 or 2v2 competitive game where players construct or use pre-made decks in a race to earn 21 points. You do this by placing new stems, filling empty card types and taking over the full board, while attempting to stop your opponent from doing the same.

It’s a simple game complicated beautifully by a couple of factors. Effects cards can be played anywhere on the board, and can change various elements of your hand, existing stems or points totals. Alongside those, players can swap one of their two actions per turn to smack the pleasingly chunky DropMix button, a risk-reward measure that spins a roulette wheel that /could/ force your opponent to discard cards (and points) on the board – plus frees up the canvas for an entirely new mix.

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You could feasibly play this game without any music, but the feeling of “owning” the mix – or having to pause the game because your Frankensteined-together, cross-genre banger is simply too good to ignore – adds a brilliant reactivity to just playing cards. And the more cards you own, the better the game gets, with players able to construct decks that allow for cascading card combos, not to mention outlandish mixes. That’s where the problems set in.

The starter set comes with 60 cards, constituting four themed decks (essentially: hip-hop, pop, rock and electronic). Don’t forget that you already need an iOS or Android device to play the app and, if you want decent sound, some speakers with a 3.5mm output, because the board’s hogging your Bluetooth connection. That’s not cheap, particularly outside North America, where the starter set’s price has been jacked up considerably.

It offers a decent number of cards, and will keep you going for some time – especially if you start deck building – but chances are you’ll begin to want more. That’s OK! Harmonix offers four more pre-made, 15-card decks along the same genre lines as the starter pack, all of which offer some of the more interesting Effects cards.

But even buying all four of those won’t complete your collection. DropMix also offers two ‘series’ of $5/£5 blind booster packs, featuring cards that can’t be found in any pre-made decks. Disappointingly, full mixes of songs have been deliberately spread across all three means of getting cards, purposefully fuelling people’s desire to buy more blind packs.

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Put it this way: imagine if this was a video game, and these cards were DLC. Imagine if an RPG gave you a helmet, and told you the rest of the armour set was DLC – but the chestpiece was in a DLC expansion, and the boots and gauntlets were found in loot boxes. Now imagine, instead of armour, it’s the four constituent parts of The Jackson 5’s ‘I Want You Back’. You get it.

It makes DropMix a complicated recommendation. At the centre of all of this is a game I’ve never seen before, and that I don’t think any other developer in the world could replicate – DropMix, as a concept, is a triumph. But it’s surrounded by a tangle of money-motivated decisions that not only lock off content that makes playing the game and your music better, but actively tries to hook you into paying more, possibly for duplicate cards.

The Verdict

Ignore the problems, and Harmonix and Hasbro’s collaboration has resulted in one of the most exciting music games of recent years – and it’s a huge shame that those problems are so hard to ignore.

Editors’ Choice

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